Tag: <span>exercise</span>

The Benefits of Tai Chi

Tai Chi is not only great exercise but it helps with balance, mental health, strength and breath. Research o fall prevention suggests the slow and meditative exercise of tai chi , with its disciplined focus on balance, may help lessen apprehension . Exercise is one of the best ways to prevent falls.

Read more about Tai Chi and how it helps people improve one’s balance as we age.

http://www.wsj.com/articles/how-tai-chi-can-help-conquer-fear-of-falling-as-we-age-1464023456

Sizing up proper portions

Learn some techniques to help train your brain to recognize and stick with healthy portions of food. Using portion control allow you to eat almost anything with an awareness of what portion sizes are.

Read more at : https://www.bostonglobe.com/business/2016/07/15/the-truth-about-portion-control/MZbiv7XxoMm5GQnQghtuHL/story.htmlMentalPress 19

Exercise is as Good as Medicine for Several Ills a Study Finds

Exercise is as effective as drugs at preventing diabetes and repeat heart attacks. It is potentially better than medicine for averting additional strokes.

Read more at http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10001424052702303643304579109240925822648

40 Facts about sleep from the National Sleep Research Project

40 Facts about sleep you probably didn’t know; some examples are ………..

– To drop off we must cool off; body temperature and the brain’s sleep-wake cycle are closely linked. That’s why hot summer nights can cause a restless sleep.

– Anything less than five minutes to fall asleep at night means you’re sleep deprived. The ideal is between 10 and 15 minutes, meaning you’re still tired enough to sleep deeply, but not so exhausted you feel sleepy by day.

-Elephants sleep standing up during non-REM sleep, but lie down for REM sleep.

– Ducks at risk of attack by predators are able to balance the need for sleep and survival, keeping one half of the brain awake while the other slips into sleep mode.

read more at:

http://www.abc.net.au/science/sleep/facts.htm

 

Exercise could counter obesity gene

Exercise could counter

 

the effects of the ‘obesity gene’

 

 

 

 

  • Being physically active could reduce the risk of being overweight for people with the obesity gene, a study finds,
Being physically active could reduce the risk of being overweight for people… (David Paul Morris / Bloomberg)
November 01, 2011|By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog

Having a so-called obesity gene doesn’t necessarily doom you to being fat, a study finds — if you stay active.

A meta-analysis that included 45 studies of 218,166 adults looked at the effect physical activity had on being saddled with a gene associated with fat mass and obesity, otherwise known as the FTO gene or obesity gene. Researchers found that having the gene upped the risk of being overweight or obese, as well as having a higher body mass index, a larger waist circumference and higher body fat percentage.

However, getting some exercise seemed to reduce that chance. Being physically active had an effect on the FTO gene, reducing obesity risk by an average of 27% compared with people who were sedentary. The same effect was not seen in an analysis of nine studies on children and teens.

In analyzing the studies, researchers set the bar fairly low for what they considered physical activity. People were deemed inactive if they had a sedentary job and did less than one hour of moderate to vigorous activity per week, or their level of physical activity was in the lowest 20% among that group of study participants.

“Our findings are highly relevant for public health,” the authors wrote in the study, released Tuesday in the journal PLoS Medicine. “They emphasize that [physical activity] is a particularly effective way of controlling body weight in individuals with a genetic predisposition towards obesity,” and it goes against the belief that genetics are unchangeable.

Getting people to understand the link between genes and lifestyle is important, they added, and could give people a sense of control in determining their health.

This finding comes on the heels of another PLoS Medicine study that found that eating a diet high in raw fruits and vegetables may have a protective effect against a gene that’s linked to a higher risk of heart attack and cardiovascular disease.

Anti-Inflammatory Diet & Pyramid

Anti-Inflammatory Diet Tips

anti inflammatory diet diet tips the wellness diet

Courtesy of Dr. Weil on Healthy Aging

It is becoming increasingly clear that chronic inflammation is the root cause of many serious illnesses – including heart disease, many cancers, and Alzheimer’s disease. We all know inflammation on the surface of the body as local redness, heat, swelling and pain. It is the cornerstone of the body’s healing response, bringing more nourishment and more immune activity to a site of injury or infection. But when inflammation persists or serves no purpose, it damages the body and causes illness. Stress, lack of exercise, genetic predisposition, and exposure to toxins (like secondhand tobacco smoke) can all contribute to such chronic inflammation, but dietary choices play a big role as well. Learning how specific foods influence the inflammatory process is the best strategy for containing it and reducing long-term disease risks. (Find more details on the mechanics of the inflammation process and the Anti-Inflammatory Food Pyramid.)

View The Pyramid Now!

The Anti-Inflammatory Diet is not a diet in the popular sense – it is not intended as a weight-loss program (although people can and do lose weight on it), nor is it an eating plan to stay on for a limited period of time. Rather, it is way of selecting and preparing foods based on scientific knowledge of how they can help your body maintain optimum health. Along with influencing inflammation, this diet will provide steady energy and ample vitamins, minerals, essential fatty acids dietary fiber, and protective phytonutrients.

You can also adapt your existing recipes according to these anti-inflammatory diet principles:

General Diet Tips:

  • Aim for variety.
  • Include as much fresh food as possible.
  • Minimize your consumption of processed foods and fast food.
  • Eat an abundance of fruits and vegetables.

Caloric Intake

  • Most adults need to consume between 2,000 and 3,000 calories a day.
  • Women and smaller and less active people need fewer calories.
  • Men and bigger and more active people need more calories.
  • If you are eating the appropriate number of calories for your level of activity, your weight should not fluctuate greatly.
  • The distribution of calories you take in should be as follows: 40 to 50 percent from carbohydrates, 30 percent from fat, and 20 to 30 percent from protein.
  • Try to include carbohydrates, fat, and protein at each meal.

Carbohydrates

  • On a 2,000-calorie-a-day diet, adult women should consume between 160 to 200 grams of carbohydrates a day.
  • Adult men should consume between 240 to 300 grams of carbohydrates a day.
  • The majority of this should be in the form of less-refined, less-processed foods with a low glycemic load.
  • Reduce your consumption of foods made with wheat flour and sugar, especially bread and most packaged snack foods (including chips and pretzels).
  • Eat more whole grains such as brown rice and bulgur wheat, in which the grain is intact or in a few large pieces. These are preferable to whole wheat flour products, which have roughly the same glycemic index as white flour products.
  • Eat more beans, winter squashes, and sweet potatoes.
  • Cook pasta al dente and eat it in moderation.
  • Avoid products made with high fructose corn syrup.

Fat

  • On a 2,000-calorie-a-day diet, 600 calories can come from fat – that is, about 67 grams. This should be in a ratio of 1:2:1 of saturated to monounsaturated to polyunsaturated fat.
  • Reduce your intake of saturated fat by eating less butter, cream, high-fat cheese, unskinned chicken and fatty meats, and products made with palm kernel oil.
  • Use extra-virgin olive oil as a main cooking oil. If you want a neutral tasting oil, use expeller-pressed, organic canola oil. Organic, high-oleic, expeller pressed versions of sunflower and safflower oil are also acceptable.
  • Avoid regular safflower and sunflower oils, corn oil, cottonseed oil, and mixed vegetable oils.
  • Strictly avoid margarine, vegetable shortening, and all products listing them as ingredients. Strictly avoid all products made with partially hydrogenated oils of any kind. Include in your diet avocados and nuts, especially walnuts, cashews, almonds, and nut butters made from these nuts.
  • For omega-3 fatty acids, eat salmon (preferably fresh or frozen wild or canned sockeye), sardines packed in water or olive oil, herring, and black cod (sablefish, butterfish); omega-3 fortified eggs; hemp seeds and flaxseeds (preferably freshly ground); or take a fish oil supplement (look for products that provide both EPA and DHA, in a convenient daily dosage of two to three grams).

Protein

  • On a 2,000-calorie-a-day diet, your daily intake of protein should be between 80 and 120 grams. Eat less protein if you have liver or kidney problems, allergies, or autoimmune disease.
  • Decrease your consumption of animal protein except for fish and high quality natural cheese and yogurt.
  • Eat more vegetable protein, especially from beans in general and soybeans in particular. Become familiar with the range of whole-soy foods available and find ones you like.

Fiber

  • Try to eat 40 grams of fiber a day. You can achieve this by increasing your consumption of fruit, especially berries, vegetables (especially beans), and whole grains.
  • Ready-made cereals can be good fiber sources, but read labels to make sure they give you at least 4 and preferably 5 grams of bran per one-ounce serving.

Phytonutrients

  • To get maximum natural protection against age-related diseases (including cardiovascular disease, cancer, and neurodegenerative disease) as well as against environmental toxicity, eat a variety of fruits, vegetables and mushrooms.
  • Choose fruits and vegetables from all parts of the color spectrum, especially berries, tomatoes, orange and yellow fruits, and dark leafy greens.
  • Choose organic produce whenever possible. Learn which conventionally grown crops are most likely to carry pesticide residues and avoid them.
  • Eat cruciferous (cabbage-family) vegetables regularly.
  • Include soy foods in your diet.
  • Drink tea instead of coffee, especially good quality white, green or oolong tea.
  • If you drink alcohol, use red wine preferentially.
  • Enjoy plain dark chocolate in moderation (with a minimum cocoa content of 70 percent).

Vitamins and Minerals
The best way to obtain all of your daily vitamins, minerals, and micronutrients is by eating a diet high in fresh foods with an abundance of fruits and vegetables. In addition, supplement your diet with the following antioxidant cocktail:

  • Vitamin C, 200 milligrams a day.
  • Vitamin E, 400 IU of natural mixed tocopherols (d-alpha-tocopherol with other tocopherols, or, better, a minimum of 80 milligrams of natural mixed tocopherols and tocotrienols).
  • Selenium, 200 micrograms of an organic (yeast-bound) form.
  • Mixed carotenoids, 10,000-15,000 IU daily.
  • The antioxidants can be most conveniently taken as part of a daily multivitamin/multimineral supplement that also provides at least 400 micrograms of folic acid and 2,000 IU of vitamin D. It should contain no iron (unless you are a female and having regular menstrual periods) and no preformed vitamin A (retinol). Take these supplements with your largest meal.
  • Women should take supplemental calcium, preferably as calcium citrate, 500-700 milligrams a day, depending on their dietary intake of this mineral. Men should avoid supplemental calcium.

Other Dietary Supplements

  • If you are not eating oily fish at least twice a week, take supplemental fish oil, in capsule or liquid form (two to three grams a day of a product containing both EPA and DHA). Look for molecularly distilled products certified to be free of heavy metals and other contaminants.
  • Talk to your doctor about going on low-dose aspirin therapy, one or two baby aspirins a day (81 or 162 milligrams).
  • If you are not regularly eating ginger and turmeric, consider taking these in supplemental form.
  • Add coQ10 to your daily regimen: 60-100 milligrams of a softgel form taken with your largest meal.
  • If you are prone to metabolic syndrome, take alpha-lipoic acid, 100 to 400 milligrams a day.

Water

  • Drink pure water, or drinks that are mostly water (tea, very diluted fruit juice, sparkling water with lemon) throughout the day.
  • Use bottled water or get a home water purifier if your tap water tastes of chlorine or other contaminants, or if you live in an area where the water is known or suspected to be contaminated.

Join Dr. Weil on Healthy Aging for more in-depth information on the anti-inflammatory diet, plus over 200 anti-inflammatory recipes, dozens of diet tips designed to help prevent age-related disease, and an exclusive version of Dr. Weil’s Anti-Inflammatory Food Pyramid!

10 ways to reduce your stress

 

BostonGlobe.com        Elizabeth Comeau

1. Set realistic goals for yourself

Don’t set yourself up for a failure. It is impossible to get an entire day’s worth of work done in 15 minutes, so don’t even make that a goal to begin with. Keep what you want to get accomplished reasonable.

2. Organize your day

Take 15 minutes to plan things out. Organizing and planning will help you avoid losing so much time that might strain you while trying to recover it.

3. Take regular breaks from busy schedule

Our body needs rest to function properly. Short breaks in the day reduce stress and can increase productivity.

4. Learn to say no

Don’t overcommit yourself. Time management is a key tool in stress management, so don’t promise more than you can handle.

5. Have a hobby

Research shows that stress is lowest and energy is highest when engaged in activities we enjoy most.

6. Talk it out

“A problem shared is half solved.” Talk to a close friend or relation if you are stressed out. Just the act of talking it out may make you feel better.

7. Laugh

Foody says laughter truly IS the best medicine. Try to find a way to lighten the situation or circumstance.
8. Reduce coffee, alcohol, tobacco
All three of these things can increase chemicals in the body that increase heart rate and can exacerbate stress.

9. Exercise daily

Exercising releases chemicals known as endorphins that help naturally combat stress and improve mood. In particular, yoga is a wonderful way to get exercise and to learn to relax and breathe properly.

10. Count to 10

When faced with a difficult problem, count backward from 10 and take a deep breath. Deep breathing can be particularly helpful.

INside Boston.com

How Being Bullied Affects Your Adulthood

Being bullied in school seems to have long term effects as teens become adults. being bullied can look similar to PTSD. Read …

American jobs are grueling, according to a newly published RAND survey.

For the first time in 2015, the nonprofit think tank asked its nationally representative survey panel about their attitudes …