Tag: <span>stress</span>

The Benefits of Tai Chi

Tai Chi is not only great exercise but it helps with balance, mental health, strength and breath. Research o fall prevention suggests the slow and meditative exercise of tai chi , with its disciplined focus on balance, may help lessen apprehension . Exercise is one of the best ways to prevent falls.

Read more about Tai Chi and how it helps people improve one’s balance as we age.

http://www.wsj.com/articles/how-tai-chi-can-help-conquer-fear-of-falling-as-we-age-1464023456

Beat Back the Self Doubt by Elizabeth Bernstein

Surprisingly simple steps to rewrite your negative thoughts in positive ones. Challenge your negative thought, practice new thoughts over and over, imagine you have a friend with the same negative thoughts and practice telling the its not true, exaggerate your negative thought to the point it is absurd ex: you’re the worst loser on the planet.

Read more at http://www.wsj.com/articles/steps-to-turn-off-the-nagging-self-doubt-in-your-head-1465838679

Exercise is as Good as Medicine for Several Ills a Study Finds

Exercise is as effective as drugs at preventing diabetes and repeat heart attacks. It is potentially better than medicine for averting additional strokes.

Read more at http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10001424052702303643304579109240925822648

Empty Nest: Why Arent We Having Fun Yet?

Empty Nest: Why couples find themselves wondering why arent we having fun yet? After all these years together, life was so busy and the focus was on the family and home and not on your relationship. Read more about how this unfolds and what to do to prevent it.

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424127887324436104578579372436143196.html

Breathe, Relax, Repeat: Devices for Inner Peace

Breathe, Relax, Repeat: Devices for Inner Peace

Read about devices to use on your phone to help you teach yourself to relax.

Read more: http://allthingsd.com/20130514/breathe-relax-repeat-devices-for-inner-peace/

1 in 5 Americans is extremely stressed: are you?

By Deborah Kotz, Globe Staff

Every year the American Psychological Association releases its “Stress in America” survey — the latest was released yesterday — warning us that we’re frazzled beyond belief, especially if we’ve got health problems or are caring for someone who does. No surprise there.

Yet I wonder just how much the survey of 1,200 reflects the national psyche of 300 million. Or whether it’s even relevant to try to summarize what the collective mass is feeling. Those who are unemployed, facing foreclosure or going through a divorce have a different set of stresses than a frazzled working mother who’s caring for a mother-in-law with back problems. (Okay, that last example was me.)

The stress survey found that more than 1 in 5 Americans report feeling chronic “extreme stress” but also found that, on average, our stress levels have dipped a smidgen since last year’s survey.

Oddly, the APA expressed alarm that only about 31 percent of the survey respondents thought that their stress level was having an impact on their health even though the vast majority said they knew that stress can contribute to major health problems like heart disease, depression, and obesity.

“When considered alongside the finding that only 29 percent of adults believe they are doing an excellent or very good job at managing or reducing stress,” the survey report stated, the “APA warns that this disconnect is cause for concern.”

I’m not really sure why it would be, if there was a lot of overlap among the 31 percent who reported that stress wasn’t affecting their health and the 29 percent who reported that they were managing their stress well.

How Being Bullied Affects Your Adulthood

Being bullied in school seems to have long term effects as teens become adults. being bullied can look similar to PTSD. Read …

American jobs are grueling, according to a newly published RAND survey.

For the first time in 2015, the nonprofit think tank asked its nationally representative survey panel about their attitudes …