Tag: weight loss

The Benefits of Tai Chi

Tai Chi is not only great exercise but it helps with balance, mental health, strength and breath. Research o fall prevention suggests the slow and meditative exercise of tai chi , with its disciplined focus on balance, may help lessen apprehension . Exercise is one of the best ways to prevent falls.

Read more about Tai Chi and how it helps people improve one’s balance as we age.

http://www.wsj.com/articles/how-tai-chi-can-help-conquer-fear-of-falling-as-we-age-1464023456

Sizing up proper portions

Learn some techniques to help train your brain to recognize and stick with healthy portions of food. Using portion control allow you to eat almost anything with an awareness of what portion sizes are.

Read more at : https://www.bostonglobe.com/business/2016/07/15/the-truth-about-portion-control/MZbiv7XxoMm5GQnQghtuHL/story.htmlMentalPress 19

New procedures hope to treat obesity without the risks of bariatric surgery

There are less invasive options becoming available for weight loss surgery. There are over 200,000 Americans who undergo the major operation called bariatric surgery to try to least weight.

Read more at http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424127887323296504578396440393998244.html

40 Facts about sleep from the National Sleep Research Project

40 Facts about sleep you probably didn’t know; some examples are ………..

– To drop off we must cool off; body temperature and the brain’s sleep-wake cycle are closely linked. That’s why hot summer nights can cause a restless sleep.

– Anything less than five minutes to fall asleep at night means you’re sleep deprived. The ideal is between 10 and 15 minutes, meaning you’re still tired enough to sleep deeply, but not so exhausted you feel sleepy by day.

-Elephants sleep standing up during non-REM sleep, but lie down for REM sleep.

– Ducks at risk of attack by predators are able to balance the need for sleep and survival, keeping one half of the brain awake while the other slips into sleep mode.

read more at:

http://www.abc.net.au/science/sleep/facts.htm

 

Researchers are discovering more ways obesity can damage one’s body

Researchers are discovering more ways obesity can  damage one’s body. These include an individual’s sense of smell, disrupting sleep and seual life and cancerous tumors can grow faster. Read more  at

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052970204598504578080683053072000.html

Study: Eat More, Weigh Less

Study: Eat More, Weigh Less

Print|Comments (13)Posted by Joan Salge Blake  April 12, 2012

Timing is everything in life….especially when it comes to weight loss.  A timely study just released from the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics reminds us that the calorie density, or the amount of calories per bite of food that you eat, may make all the difference in helping you painlessly shed some of that extra winter weight.

Just ask Barbara Rolls, PhD, researcher, and author of the just released, The Ultimate Volumetrics Diet, an updated and expanded version of her bestseller book published in 2004.  According to research, much of which was conducted by Rolls, it is the volume of food rather than the calories that is the key to helping you feel satisfied or satiated when you eat.   Translation:  When it comes to weight loss, you need to outsmart your stomach by filling it up with a large volume of low calorie-dense foods to satisfy your hunger, which will enable you to cutback on daily calories.  In this case, size does matter.

For example, an apple that would fit in the palm of your hand (about 3 inches) is a mere 75 calories.  Because over 85 percent of its weight is from water (0 calories) and fiber (0 calories), it is considered a low-density food as it is low in calories per bite.  However, a slice of apple pie, which could also fit in the palm of your hand, has calorie-dense fat and sugar added, along with the apples, so will serve up about 300 calories a slice.  (That’s without the a la mode part.)  You would have to eat four apples to consume the equivalent of the calories in the pie slice.  Because of the apple’s volume, you would likely get “full” after chomping on an apple or two, and thus, consume less calories overall.

Compare these two meals:

Source: CDC

Volume-wise, the more colorful dinner plate of grilled chicken, which is loaded with tons of low calorie, high-volume veggies is going to fill you up for less calories compared to the higher fat, more caloric-dense fried chicken meal.   In fact, the puny portions in the fried chicken dinner may cause you to go back for seconds (adding more calories to your meal) in order to obtain the volume of foods you need to eat to feel full.

The same strategy goes for soups.   By ladling a low-calorie dense, veggie-based soup rather than a high calorie-dense fatty chowder in your bowl, you will end up consuming the same volume of soup but for less calories:

Source: CDC

This is actually part of the logic behind the new MyPlate.  By devoting half of your plate to low- calorie, high-volume fruits and veggies, you will crowd out the higher, calorie-dense items on your plate while feeling satisfied.

Need help in planning meals that are voluminous but not high in calories?   The Ultimate Volumetrics Diet also contains over 100 new recipes developed by registered dietitian and culinary wizard, Mindy Hermann, as well as advice for when you are food shopping and dining out.

You can eat more and weigh less.

Originally published on the blog Nutrition and You!.

Exercise could counter obesity gene

Exercise could counter

 

the effects of the ‘obesity gene’

 

 

 

 

  • Being physically active could reduce the risk of being overweight for people with the obesity gene, a study finds,
Being physically active could reduce the risk of being overweight for people… (David Paul Morris / Bloomberg)
November 01, 2011|By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog

Having a so-called obesity gene doesn’t necessarily doom you to being fat, a study finds — if you stay active.

A meta-analysis that included 45 studies of 218,166 adults looked at the effect physical activity had on being saddled with a gene associated with fat mass and obesity, otherwise known as the FTO gene or obesity gene. Researchers found that having the gene upped the risk of being overweight or obese, as well as having a higher body mass index, a larger waist circumference and higher body fat percentage.

However, getting some exercise seemed to reduce that chance. Being physically active had an effect on the FTO gene, reducing obesity risk by an average of 27% compared with people who were sedentary. The same effect was not seen in an analysis of nine studies on children and teens.

In analyzing the studies, researchers set the bar fairly low for what they considered physical activity. People were deemed inactive if they had a sedentary job and did less than one hour of moderate to vigorous activity per week, or their level of physical activity was in the lowest 20% among that group of study participants.

“Our findings are highly relevant for public health,” the authors wrote in the study, released Tuesday in the journal PLoS Medicine. “They emphasize that [physical activity] is a particularly effective way of controlling body weight in individuals with a genetic predisposition towards obesity,” and it goes against the belief that genetics are unchangeable.

Getting people to understand the link between genes and lifestyle is important, they added, and could give people a sense of control in determining their health.

This finding comes on the heels of another PLoS Medicine study that found that eating a diet high in raw fruits and vegetables may have a protective effect against a gene that’s linked to a higher risk of heart attack and cardiovascular disease.

Procedure’s Benefits Go Beyond Weight Loss

By RON WINSLOW

About 200,000 Americans undergo surgical procedures to shrink their stomachs each year in the hope that the resulting weight loss will prevent heart attacks and other consequences of obesity.

Now, a new study that tracked more than 4,000 Swedish patients for a median follow-up of nearly 15 years found the procedures were associated with significant relative reductions in risk of heart-related death, heart attacks and strokes.

Those benefits weren’t associated with the degree of weight loss.

The findings support growing evidence that the benefits from the surgery—one of the few effective remedies against extreme obesity—come from a variety of biological changes that often occur independently of weight loss.

“Given the known association between obesity and cardiovascular disease, intuition would have predicted that the reduced incidence of cardiovascular events would be related to weight loss,” write the research team, led by Lars Sjöström of Sweden’s University of Gothenburg. But the researchers failed to find a significant link between the two.

The findings challenge the practice of using a measurement called body mass index, or BMI, as the key criterion for eligibility for the procedure, some researchers say.

The new study found that the absolute benefit in reducing risk of serious heart events was small: There were 28 heart-related deaths over the study period among 2,010 patients who underwent surgery, compared with 49 deaths among 2,037 who were in a matched control group.

Reports from the same patient group, including one published in 2007, found surgery was associated with a reduction in death from any cause, and favorable outcomes for cancer, diabetes and other conditions.

U.S. guidelines say candidates for surgery should have a BMI, a calculation based on height and weight, of 40 or more, or 35 or more with a obesity-related disease such as diabetes. Last year, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration lowered the requirements for a less invasive bariatric strategy called gastric- banding to patients with a BMI between 30 and 40 who have at least one complicating disease.

The new study wasn’t a randomized trial—patients between 37 and 60 years old who underwent one of three different approaches to surgery were matched with patients of a similar gender, age and BMI.

Average weight loss among bariatric patients ranged between 16% and 23% for up to 20 years of follow-up, compared with about zero in the non-surgical patients.

Robin Blackstone, president of the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery said recent research shows biological effects of surgery, including lower levels of a hormone called leptin, appear to explain benefits not associated with weight loss.

Write to Ron Winslow at ron.winslow@wsj.com

New ways calories can add up to weight gain.

By RON WINSLOW

Whether you are just starting a New Year’s diet or struggling to maintain a healthy weight, a provocative new study offers some timely guidance. It isn’t so much what you eat, the study suggests, but how much you eat that counts when it comes to accumulating body fat.

The findings are the latest in a string of studies to challenge claims that the secret to healthy weight loss lies in adjusting the amount of nutritional components of a diet—protein, fat and carbohydrates.

A new obesity study linked calorie count, versus proteins or carbs, to weight gain, Ron Winslow reports on the News Hub. Photo: AP.

The diet industry has offered dozens of strategies recommending raising or lowering carbohydrates, protein or fat.

In the study, to be published in Wednesday’s issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, 25 young, healthy men and women were deliberately fed nearly 1,000 excess calories a day for 56 days, but with diets that varied in the amounts of protein and fat.

While those on a low-protein diet—about 5% of total calories—gained less weight than those on a normal- or high-protein regimen, body fat among participants in all three groups increased by about the same amount. Typical protein consumption is about 15% of calories, while the U.S. government recommends it make up between 17% and 21% of total daily calories.

Getty ImagesA woman stands on a scale during her weekly weigh-in at the Wellspring Academy, a California school to help teens lose weight.

“The body was confronted with excess calories, but it didn’t care where they came from,” said George Bray, a researcher at Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Baton Rouge, La., and lead author of the report. “The only thing it can do is put them into fat.”

The findings suggest that it matters little whether a diet is high or low in fat, carbohydrates or protein, it’s calories that build body fat.

“That’s a very important message,” said Francisco Lopez-Jimenez, an obesity researcher at Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn., who wasn’t involved with the study. “Weight gain depends primarily on excess calories, regardless of the composition of the meal.”

[OBESE]

More than 60% of U.S. adults are considered overweight and more than 30% are obese, defined as having a body mass index, or BMI, of 30 or higher.

There was a potentially detrimental effect of the low-protein diet: Participants had a reduction in levels of lean body mass. Those whose diet was 15% or 25% protein had an increase in lean body mass, a reason why they gained more weight than those on low-protein fare.

“There is no health-related benefit to a reduction in lean body mass,” said Dr. Bray. “That’s not what you want to happen.”

A New Year’s resolution to lose weight could also boost your bank account, Kelli Grant reports on Lunch Break. Photo: Getty Images.

BMI, a calculation based on height and weight, is widely used to describe the weight status of a population. But it is increasingly controversial when used to assess the health of individual patients.

Edward Livingston, a gastrointestinal surgeon and researcher at University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas, said the fact that patients in the study gained less weight on a low-protein diet but still accumulated substantial body fat suggests relying on BMI measurement may be misleading patients and doctors about obesity risk.

“If your diet is poor, it might be the fat that hurts you,” said Dr. Livingston, who wasn’t involved in the latest study.

“You can’t just look at BMI. That’s a function of your body weight. You ought to be looking at the fat,” he said, and not just body weight.

The patients in the Pennington study ranged in age from 18 to 35 and had BMIs between 19 and 30. (Between 25 and 30 is considered overweight.)

They lived at the center’s metabolic unit for between 10 and 12 weeks and were fed the 1,000 extra calories a day for the final eight weeks of their stay.

Dr. Bray said the more than 50,000 extra calories were roughly equivalent to the excess calories the average American consumes over a decade.

The New Year’s push to lose weight is bringing crowds to gyms. Jason Gay offers tips to conquering the gym. Photo: Getty Images.

“It was quite a load,” he said, but if they spread the calories out over a longer time “it would take us years to see the changes.”

Carbohydrates were held steady at about 41% to 42% of calories while fat levels varied with the protein regimen.

Regular exercise wasn’t part of the participants’ routine. Physical activity was controlled and participants were monitored to make sure they ate all the food they were given.

After eight weeks, all participants in the study gained weight. The 16 men and nine women made similar gains. The low protein-diet group gained about seven pounds, about half the 13.3 pounds added on by the normal protein participants and 14.4 pounds put on by the high protein group.

Researchers said that previous studies had led them to expect that a high-protein diet would lead to lower weight gain. Yet despite the differences in protein and fat intake, the level of body fat increased by essentially the same amount among all the participants.

Turkey, chicken, tuna and pork chops were among the protein sources. The menu items were the same for each participant, Dr. Bray said, but a participant on the low-protein diet would have gotten more mayonnaise and less tuna in a tuna fish salad, while the high-protein diet was extra tuna with little mayonnaise.

An editorial accompanying the study said that because the diet increase “the risks of overnutrition beyond that detected by body mass index…the magnitude of the obesity epidemic may have been underestimated.”

The editorial, by Zhaoping Li and David Heber of the Center for Human Nutrition at the David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, urged clinicians to focus on “fat reduction rather than simply weight loss” in treating patients with obesity.

Write to Ron Winslow at ron.winslow@wsj.com

Anti-Inflammatory Diet & Pyramid

Anti-Inflammatory Diet Tips

anti inflammatory diet diet tips the wellness diet

Courtesy of Dr. Weil on Healthy Aging

It is becoming increasingly clear that chronic inflammation is the root cause of many serious illnesses – including heart disease, many cancers, and Alzheimer’s disease. We all know inflammation on the surface of the body as local redness, heat, swelling and pain. It is the cornerstone of the body’s healing response, bringing more nourishment and more immune activity to a site of injury or infection. But when inflammation persists or serves no purpose, it damages the body and causes illness. Stress, lack of exercise, genetic predisposition, and exposure to toxins (like secondhand tobacco smoke) can all contribute to such chronic inflammation, but dietary choices play a big role as well. Learning how specific foods influence the inflammatory process is the best strategy for containing it and reducing long-term disease risks. (Find more details on the mechanics of the inflammation process and the Anti-Inflammatory Food Pyramid.)

View The Pyramid Now!

The Anti-Inflammatory Diet is not a diet in the popular sense – it is not intended as a weight-loss program (although people can and do lose weight on it), nor is it an eating plan to stay on for a limited period of time. Rather, it is way of selecting and preparing foods based on scientific knowledge of how they can help your body maintain optimum health. Along with influencing inflammation, this diet will provide steady energy and ample vitamins, minerals, essential fatty acids dietary fiber, and protective phytonutrients.

You can also adapt your existing recipes according to these anti-inflammatory diet principles:

General Diet Tips:

  • Aim for variety.
  • Include as much fresh food as possible.
  • Minimize your consumption of processed foods and fast food.
  • Eat an abundance of fruits and vegetables.

Caloric Intake

  • Most adults need to consume between 2,000 and 3,000 calories a day.
  • Women and smaller and less active people need fewer calories.
  • Men and bigger and more active people need more calories.
  • If you are eating the appropriate number of calories for your level of activity, your weight should not fluctuate greatly.
  • The distribution of calories you take in should be as follows: 40 to 50 percent from carbohydrates, 30 percent from fat, and 20 to 30 percent from protein.
  • Try to include carbohydrates, fat, and protein at each meal.

Carbohydrates

  • On a 2,000-calorie-a-day diet, adult women should consume between 160 to 200 grams of carbohydrates a day.
  • Adult men should consume between 240 to 300 grams of carbohydrates a day.
  • The majority of this should be in the form of less-refined, less-processed foods with a low glycemic load.
  • Reduce your consumption of foods made with wheat flour and sugar, especially bread and most packaged snack foods (including chips and pretzels).
  • Eat more whole grains such as brown rice and bulgur wheat, in which the grain is intact or in a few large pieces. These are preferable to whole wheat flour products, which have roughly the same glycemic index as white flour products.
  • Eat more beans, winter squashes, and sweet potatoes.
  • Cook pasta al dente and eat it in moderation.
  • Avoid products made with high fructose corn syrup.

Fat

  • On a 2,000-calorie-a-day diet, 600 calories can come from fat – that is, about 67 grams. This should be in a ratio of 1:2:1 of saturated to monounsaturated to polyunsaturated fat.
  • Reduce your intake of saturated fat by eating less butter, cream, high-fat cheese, unskinned chicken and fatty meats, and products made with palm kernel oil.
  • Use extra-virgin olive oil as a main cooking oil. If you want a neutral tasting oil, use expeller-pressed, organic canola oil. Organic, high-oleic, expeller pressed versions of sunflower and safflower oil are also acceptable.
  • Avoid regular safflower and sunflower oils, corn oil, cottonseed oil, and mixed vegetable oils.
  • Strictly avoid margarine, vegetable shortening, and all products listing them as ingredients. Strictly avoid all products made with partially hydrogenated oils of any kind. Include in your diet avocados and nuts, especially walnuts, cashews, almonds, and nut butters made from these nuts.
  • For omega-3 fatty acids, eat salmon (preferably fresh or frozen wild or canned sockeye), sardines packed in water or olive oil, herring, and black cod (sablefish, butterfish); omega-3 fortified eggs; hemp seeds and flaxseeds (preferably freshly ground); or take a fish oil supplement (look for products that provide both EPA and DHA, in a convenient daily dosage of two to three grams).

Protein

  • On a 2,000-calorie-a-day diet, your daily intake of protein should be between 80 and 120 grams. Eat less protein if you have liver or kidney problems, allergies, or autoimmune disease.
  • Decrease your consumption of animal protein except for fish and high quality natural cheese and yogurt.
  • Eat more vegetable protein, especially from beans in general and soybeans in particular. Become familiar with the range of whole-soy foods available and find ones you like.

Fiber

  • Try to eat 40 grams of fiber a day. You can achieve this by increasing your consumption of fruit, especially berries, vegetables (especially beans), and whole grains.
  • Ready-made cereals can be good fiber sources, but read labels to make sure they give you at least 4 and preferably 5 grams of bran per one-ounce serving.

Phytonutrients

  • To get maximum natural protection against age-related diseases (including cardiovascular disease, cancer, and neurodegenerative disease) as well as against environmental toxicity, eat a variety of fruits, vegetables and mushrooms.
  • Choose fruits and vegetables from all parts of the color spectrum, especially berries, tomatoes, orange and yellow fruits, and dark leafy greens.
  • Choose organic produce whenever possible. Learn which conventionally grown crops are most likely to carry pesticide residues and avoid them.
  • Eat cruciferous (cabbage-family) vegetables regularly.
  • Include soy foods in your diet.
  • Drink tea instead of coffee, especially good quality white, green or oolong tea.
  • If you drink alcohol, use red wine preferentially.
  • Enjoy plain dark chocolate in moderation (with a minimum cocoa content of 70 percent).

Vitamins and Minerals
The best way to obtain all of your daily vitamins, minerals, and micronutrients is by eating a diet high in fresh foods with an abundance of fruits and vegetables. In addition, supplement your diet with the following antioxidant cocktail:

  • Vitamin C, 200 milligrams a day.
  • Vitamin E, 400 IU of natural mixed tocopherols (d-alpha-tocopherol with other tocopherols, or, better, a minimum of 80 milligrams of natural mixed tocopherols and tocotrienols).
  • Selenium, 200 micrograms of an organic (yeast-bound) form.
  • Mixed carotenoids, 10,000-15,000 IU daily.
  • The antioxidants can be most conveniently taken as part of a daily multivitamin/multimineral supplement that also provides at least 400 micrograms of folic acid and 2,000 IU of vitamin D. It should contain no iron (unless you are a female and having regular menstrual periods) and no preformed vitamin A (retinol). Take these supplements with your largest meal.
  • Women should take supplemental calcium, preferably as calcium citrate, 500-700 milligrams a day, depending on their dietary intake of this mineral. Men should avoid supplemental calcium.

Other Dietary Supplements

  • If you are not eating oily fish at least twice a week, take supplemental fish oil, in capsule or liquid form (two to three grams a day of a product containing both EPA and DHA). Look for molecularly distilled products certified to be free of heavy metals and other contaminants.
  • Talk to your doctor about going on low-dose aspirin therapy, one or two baby aspirins a day (81 or 162 milligrams).
  • If you are not regularly eating ginger and turmeric, consider taking these in supplemental form.
  • Add coQ10 to your daily regimen: 60-100 milligrams of a softgel form taken with your largest meal.
  • If you are prone to metabolic syndrome, take alpha-lipoic acid, 100 to 400 milligrams a day.

Water

  • Drink pure water, or drinks that are mostly water (tea, very diluted fruit juice, sparkling water with lemon) throughout the day.
  • Use bottled water or get a home water purifier if your tap water tastes of chlorine or other contaminants, or if you live in an area where the water is known or suspected to be contaminated.

Join Dr. Weil on Healthy Aging for more in-depth information on the anti-inflammatory diet, plus over 200 anti-inflammatory recipes, dozens of diet tips designed to help prevent age-related disease, and an exclusive version of Dr. Weil’s Anti-Inflammatory Food Pyramid!

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